I Deserve it Features – the Owner’s Entry

At KGA, we love incorporating “I Deserve it Features” into our home designs! From simple details to one-of-a-kind custom designs, “I Deserve it Features” take on many shapes and sizes. Over the next couple of months, we will be looking at 3 common places that “I Deserve it Features” can be incorporated into the home, regardless of how big or small your home is. First up – the owner’s entry!

Before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s talk about what an “I Deserve it Feature” actually is. The phrase was coined by Faith Popcorn in 1992. When applied to residential design, this phrase describes a space or feature not necessary to the home but once experienced, something we cannot live without. If you are lucky enough to live in a home that is thoughtfully designed to include one or more of these…then, you know! We like to think of these functional and efficient spaces as concepts that make day-to-day life easier.

In recent years, the owner’s entry (sometimes called a mudroom) has become a common “I Deserve it Feature” in new homes…and we can see why! A less sparkly area of the home commonly referred to as a service space, the owner’s entry is one of the most used areas of the home, despite its modest allure. When properly located and designed with features that help organize a household, support a lifestyle, and provide a high performing portal from the garage to the home, this “I deserve it feature” becomes very important to our active Colorado lifestyle and climate.

Owner’s Entry by KGA Studio Architects

First, and most importantly, the laundry room is no longer part of this space. Even in the most modest of homes, entering the residence should not mean stepping over piles of laundry and tracking grit from the outside world into a space where we wash our clothes. Instead, we find these features: a bench so we can remove our snowy boots, a closet or wall hooks for the kids to hang up their coats, and cabinetry that provides a place to organize our keys, recharge our phones or simply drop an armful of items as we enter the home. Perhaps this area is a place to enter a pantry closet to stow groceries before entering the kitchen, thus saving a few steps along the way. This is also a place for the pet, their food bowls, a leash hook, and perhaps an exit to the outdoors.

Modern Cottage
Cottage

With a goal to tame the clutter, perhaps there are cubbies to stash gloves and scarves to help get the kids out the door more efficiently. There should be drawers to store items that don’t have another place in the house such as the manuals for the kitchen appliances and batteries. A last thought might be to include a whiteboard to make notes to remind you of tasks to be done and places to be for the day. This is your home’s Grand Central Station. The entire family arrives and departs from here.

While this is not the place for lavish finishes, the materials must be durable and easily cleaned. Make an effort to give it a bit of sparkle, however, after all it is the first space you see as you enter the house and the last room you experience as you leave. The owner’s entry should be welcoming after a long day of work or herding the little ones.

Minneapolis Charmer

Another aspect of the owner’s entry that we are now designing into our homes, if space allows, is the project alcove. This space provides an area for lingering projects, a hobby or a task that often has no other space in the home. Sometimes it can be a home management space that connects directly to the kitchen. Unlike the utility nature and whirl of action found at the owner’s entry, the project alcove is a more controlled and finished space.

Summit Craft Room - KGA Studio Architects
This KGA designed model by Epic Homes features a project area located directly behind the kitchen.
Classic Transformation

Like any space in a well-designed home, the owner’s entry should be thought through. It should provide transitional passage from the garage (or, in the case of many older homes, from the outdoors), help the owners with organization, and not simply be a door that drops you unceremoniously into the kitchen, hall, or living room.